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Wednesday, 13. August 2014

iMac and Macbook Data Recovery

By cliven, 15:03
Recovery Data From Broken Macbook and iMac Computers
I made the leap of faith about 2 years ago… Changing my allegiance from Windows - which I'd used since the mid 90's when it first came out right up until about 2011 when I'd decided that enough was enough. Once I did start using Mac's, the only question I asked myself was "Why didn't I do this sooner?".

Although in my opinion Mac's are far more user friendly than PCs, they still have the one weakness just as PCs - the hard drive (Wiki definition: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hard_disk_drive). Hard drives are the components that hold all your data as you probably know, and they are brittle devices. A fall or heavy knock can disable a Mac hard drive and prevent you being able to get at your data anymore. Of course, it's a good idea to make backups of your data but few of us actually do. So what happens when we have a fault on our MacBooks or iMacs and we can't get at our data?

The procedure to follow depends on what has actually gone wrong with the Macbook or iMac hard drive. Is it still recognised, can it still be accessed? or does your Mac tell you that there's no hard drive present or detected? If your Mac still detects your hard drive then files and data can usually be recovered by running some sort of Mac file recovery utility on the Mac's hard drive or by using a remote file recovery service. If your hard drive is not detected by your Mac anymore it probably means you've got a more significant problem with your Mac hard drive and may require a data recovery service to take a look at the hard drive and recover the data. Data Clinic provide both a remote file recovery service and Mac data recovery service at http://www.dataclinic.co.uk/apple-mac-data-recovery, and have several Mac data recovery service centres across the United Kingdom. You can call them on 0871 977 2525, or go to their web site for accurate and up to date information.

There are two types of hard drive in Mac computers. iMacs and Macbook tend to use hard drives type HDD while the higher end products use the type of hard drives known as SSD. HDD Mac hard drives are mechanical devices and can store huge amounts of data, SSD's are a digital type of hard drive costing more and sorting less than HDD's. Both HDD and SSD hard drives break and if you haven't backed up the data from your Mac you'll still require a data recovery service to restore the files from your hard drive.